Friends of Mountain Road Woodcuts

Friends of Mountain Road Woodcuts
by Chris Lucas

The Friends of Mountain Road Woodcut Prints

You know how you plan to do just one thing, but then other cool things get in the way? Downtown Albuquerque can be like that; it's easy to find yourself exploring places that weren't part of the plan. On my way into Downtown to pass by an almost 100-year-old adobe home designed by Anna Gotshall, a local 1920's architect, I became distracted.

Driving up & down Mountain Road recently, you can't help but notice the white printed banners hanging from stylized posts along both sides of the street. One of the banners mentioned the FriendsOfMountainRoad.com site, which explained that the banners were part of a woodcut print exhibition. Parking around the Harwood Arts Center is a good place to start a woodcut art tour. From there, the seven-block Mountain Road art installation extends a few blocks east of the Harwood, & then west as far as 12th St. The 13 images, created by local artists, feature detailed woodcut prints turned into banners, that are repeated along the length of the exhibition. Organized by artist Julianna Kirwin, she is helping to bring a sense of momentum to the Mountain Road corridor.

The pieces catch your eyes as you walk by, examples below. I love woodcuts because there's a lot going on--from a block of wood, the artist carves out the negative (white) space, then pulling it through an ink press allows the dark areas to become apparent & helps form the image on a piece of paper (or banner, in this case). It's intimately hand-created from beginning to end...Walking the entire route on both sides of Mountain Road, the images provide a sense of the corridor from way back when; newer additions like coffee shops & residential infill add to the continuing vibrancy of the area.


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MetroABQ Historic Architecture Styles: Territorial

MetroABQ Historic Architecture Styles: Territorial
by Chris Lucas

From Wiki: Territorial Style was an architectural style of building developed and used in the New Mexico Territory from the time of the American occupation in 1846 until 1912,[1] at which time New Mexico stopped being a territory & became a stateA vernacular subgroup, from 1860-1935, of the Territorial Style is known as the Folk Territorial, Folk Carpenter, & Spanish Folk Territorial. The style was found "particularly in Northern New Mexico", & consisted of applied wood Greek RevivalGothic details, added to the building styles of the Pueblos & the Spanish missions in New Mexico, the Northern New Mexico adobe building construction style.[2] Following the increase of its popularity in the 1930s & 1940s, it became referred to as the Territorial Revival style, which became another popular building style alongside New Mexico's Pueblo Revival style.  Read More


MetroABQ People Circa 1969: Let The Sunshine In at The ABQ Museum

MetroABQ People Circa 1969: Let The Sunshine In at The ABQ Museum
by Chris Lucas

Although not currently open, the ABQ Museum is still featuring Let The Sunshine In online, a peek into the time period & life of a diverse Burqueños from 1969-1971. There are 1500+ images in the archive that depict Albuquerque from people crossing streets, to interesting residential & large-scale commercial architecture, to aerial views of the city & hundreds of other objects along the way. Read More


MetroABQ Downtown Plaza to Plaza Walk

MetroABQ Downtown Plaza to Plaza Walk
by Chris Lucas

MetroABQ Plaza to Plaza Architectural Walking Tour -- From Downtown to Old Town. Read More


A Buyer's Home Purchase Guidebook

A Buyer's Home Purchase Guidebook
by Chris Lucas

I've been working with an equal number of buyers & sellers each year. Both types of transactions can be(come) quite complicated. There are upwards of 100+ details to consider in the buying or selling of real estate, & missing just one of them can create challenges. Read More


Downtown Art & Architecture Junction Part II

Downtown Art & Architecture Junction Part II
by Chris Lucas


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