Piedras Marcadas Canyon -- Humanoid Petroglyphs Part I

Piedras Marcadas Canyon -- Humanoid Petroglyphs Part I
by Chris Lucas

Among The Piedras Marcadas Petroglyphs
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Piedras Marcadas Canyon -- Animal-Like Petroglyphs

Piedras Marcadas Canyon -- Animal-Like Petroglyphs
by Chris Lucas

Above are a few animal-like petroglyphs found pecked into the rocks. More are here. I wondered what the difference was between Petroglyphs & Pictographs, which resembles the difference between sculpture & painting: petroglyphs are images carved, pecked or scratched into stone, while pictographs are rocks painted with natural pigments over stone, like a canvas.
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MetroABQ Parks & Greenspaces Part III

MetroABQ Parks & Greenspaces Part III
by Chris Lucas

Parks & Greenspaces Part I & Part II  Read More


MetroABQ Newsletter -- December: Public Art & Parks & Greenspaces

MetroABQ Newsletter -- December: Public Art & Parks & Greenspaces
by Chris Lucas

Click for the December MetroABQ NewsletterRead More


3-D Walking Tour & Open House: 6808 Astair Ave NW in Taylor Ranch 87120

3-D Walking Tour & Open House: 6808 Astair Ave NW in Taylor Ranch 87120
by Chris Lucas

Pocket Park Along The Santo Domingo Trail -- MetroABQ NW

Pocket Park Along The Santo Domingo Trail -- MetroABQ NW
by Chris Lucas

On my way to a new listing (with a cool 3-D Walking Tour) in the Taylor Ranch neighborhood of Santa Fe Village, I pass a shaded little pocket park. Thirty-year mature shade trees line a 1/10-mile walkway with benches on each side; it meanders over a San Antonio arroyo culvert & connects to the Santo Domingo Bikepath greenspace. The park is a slice of green on the edge of busy Unser Blvd on one side & the limited-access Santa Fe Village pocket neighborhood on the other.   Read More


MetroABQ’s Urban Heat Island & the Petroglyph Monument

MetroABQ’s Urban Heat Island & the Petroglyph Monument
by Chris Lucas

An Urban Heat Island (UHI), found in metropolitan areas, is when the city temperature is considerably warmer than the surrounding rural areas, due to human activities. In these areas, the temperature is often much higher at night, and the effect is more pronounced during the summer and winter. Urban Heat Islands are caused by dark or massively solid surfaces, which absorb/collect heat, then release that heat at night; asphalt, concrete and tar are good examples—think of large paved parking lots, tar and gravel roofs and concrete arroyos and buildings. A lack of vegetation is another reason for UHI effects: with fewer trees, cities lose essential cooling effect and valuable shade; and the removal of carbon dioxide, created by the trees, adds to the temperature rise. Besides the increase in temperature, UHI’s can alter cloud patterns and trap particulate matter below cooler layers, creating pollution. UHI’s increase the demand for energy—air conditioners run longer—which costs more, and creates more waste pollution. An example of the Urban Heat Island effect is the weather forecast: notice the temps up & down the Rio Grande Valley—the Metro temperature is often higher than areas north or south.  Read More