John Gaw Meem: Iconic Spanish Pueblo Architect

John Gaw Meem: Iconic Spanish Pueblo Architect
by Chris Lucas

Architectural Spotlight: John Gaw Meem & NM Spanish Pueblo Revival architecture  Read More


MetroABQ Little Free Libraries

MetroABQ Little Free Libraries
by Chris Lucas

MetroABQ Little Free Libraries  Read More


MetroABQ Historic Architecture Styles: Territorial

MetroABQ Historic Architecture Styles: Territorial
by Chris Lucas

From Wiki: Territorial Style was an architectural style of building developed and used in the New Mexico Territory from the time of the American occupation in 1846 until 1912,[1] at which time New Mexico stopped being a territory & became a stateA vernacular subgroup, from 1860-1935, of the Territorial Style is known as the Folk Territorial, Folk Carpenter, & Spanish Folk Territorial. The style was found "particularly in Northern New Mexico", & consisted of applied wood Greek RevivalGothic details, added to the building styles of the Pueblos & the Spanish missions in New Mexico, the Northern New Mexico adobe building construction style.[2] Following the increase of its popularity in the 1930s & 1940s, it became referred to as the Territorial Revival style, which became another popular building style alongside New Mexico's Pueblo Revival style.  Read More


The Southwest Brewery and Ice Company Building Downtown

The Southwest Brewery and Ice Company Building Downtown
by Chris Lucas

Sitting at VM, a hip new Downtown coffee house, & staring northward, the historic Southwest Brewery & Ice Company building is too prominent a neighbor to ignore. Built in 1899, the five-story brick building, which is decorated with wonderful diamond-ribbon brickwork, arched brick lintels & brick columns that run up the building, is one of the only surviving 19th-century commercial buildings in the downtown area.  Read More


MetroABQ People Circa 1969: Let The Sunshine In at The ABQ Museum

MetroABQ People Circa 1969: Let The Sunshine In at The ABQ Museum
by Chris Lucas

Although not currently open, the ABQ Museum is still featuring Let The Sunshine In online, a peek into the time period & life of a diverse Burqueños from 1969-1971. There are 1500+ images in the archive that depict Albuquerque from people crossing streets, to interesting residential & large-scale commercial architecture, to aerial views of the city & hundreds of other objects along the way. Read More